Markie Dearest
steveblakegriffin:

ON. MY. ABS.

steveblakegriffin:

ON. MY. ABS.

blacknoonajade:

karkles-the-adorabloodthirsty:

sonofbaldwin:

I got dressed in my traditional Indian regalia, but there was a man, he was the producer of the whole show. He took that speech away from me and he warned me very sternly. “I’ll give you 60 seconds or less. And if you go over that 60 seconds, I’ll have you arrested. I’ll have you put in handcuffs.”

- Sacheen Littlefeather in Reel Injun (2009), dir. Neil Diamond.

They were MAD, CONFUSED AND PRESSED that Marlon Brando would betray White Supremacy in this way.

To this very day, they are TWISTED over this.

And when Littlefeather got up there and READ THEM FOR FILTH, they GAGGED. For eons.

So I imagine there are people like me out there who’ve never even heard of Marlon Brando and are extremely confused over why this is important.

Marlon Brando was the Don in The Godfather, and in 1973, he was nominated for and won an Academy Award for it. However, he was also a huge Natives rights activist, and boycotted the ceremony because he felt that Hollywood’s depictions of Native Americans in the media led to the Wounded Knee Incident (which I was always taught as “the second massacre at Wounded Knee” but apparently that’s not the real name). He sent Sacheen Littlefeather, an Apache Native rights activist, in his stead. Wikipedia’s article on her explains the rest:

Brando had written a 15-page speech for Littlefeather to give at the ceremony, but when the producer met her backstage he threatened to physically remove her or have her arrested if she spoke on stage for more than 60 seconds.[5] Her on-stage comments were therefore improvised. She then went backstage and read the entire speech to the press. In his autobiography My Word is My BondRoger Moore (who presented the award) claims he took the Oscar home with him and kept it in his possession until it was collected by an armed guard sent by the Academy.

That is what this gifset is about.

You have GOT to read up on this. The Wounded Knee Incident, Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather, Anna Mae Aquash. ALL OF IT. 

hersheywrites:

Oh
My
God
thisisbeautiful

hersheywrites:

Oh

My

God

thisisbeautiful

yahoneydip:

This fucking woman

redzapato:

CURVE THEM FOREVER

redzapato:

CURVE THEM FOREVER

Ignorance is acceptable up to a point. For instance, when I was 12 years old my mom had to take me aside in the hippie store and explain to me why I, a 12-year-old white girl, could not wear a dashiki. But I was 12, I didn’t know what a dashiki was and I just thought it was a neat pattern. Now I understand. You don’t play dress-up with other people’s cultures to assert your own uniqueness and specialness.
Avril Lavigne’s New Video Wins The Gold At The Cultural Appropriation Olympics By Robyn Pennacchia (x)
blackglorious:

ancestralvoices:

The concept of sticking pins in a doll used to inflict pain on others is not traditional in the practice of Haitian Vodun. Dolls/figurines have been used as symbolic icons on shrines or in rituals to represent the Loa/Lwa (Divine forces of nature). 










Voodoo dolls are now commonly found in New Orleans, Louisiana; this is due to the mix of spiritual practices including Vodun, Hoodoo and European magical practices.Some Western African practices use figures with and nails and pins in them they are known as nkisi. However instead of being used to inflict pain they are essentially a container of spiritual forces that are used for healing purposes. The concept of revenge dolls can be traced back to medieval European folk magic with use of poppets, effigies of specific people, which were used to place curses. The poppets however were also used for positive purposes such as healing and bringing good luck.NOTE INCLUDING VISUALShttps://www.facebook.com/notes/ancestral-voices-esoteric-african-knowledge/did-you-know/433913709971094?ref=notif&notif_t=like











I love this!

blackglorious:

ancestralvoices:

The concept of sticking pins in a doll used to inflict pain on others is not traditional in the practice of Haitian Vodun. Dolls/figurines have been used as symbolic icons on shrines or in rituals to represent the Loa/Lwa (Divine forces of nature). 


Voodoo dolls are now commonly found in New Orleans, Louisiana; this is due to the mix of spiritual practices including Vodun, Hoodoo and European magical practices.

Some Western African practices use figures with and nails and pins in them they are known as nkisi. However instead of being used to inflict pain they are essentially a container of spiritual forces that are used for healing purposes. 

The concept of revenge dolls can be traced back to medieval European folk magic with use of poppets, effigies of specific people, which were used to place curses. The poppets however were also used for positive purposes such as healing and bringing good luck.

NOTE INCLUDING VISUALS
https://www.facebook.com/
notes/ancestral-voices-esoteric-african-knowledge/did-you-know/433913709971094?ref=notif&notif_t=like

I love this!

gradientlair:

Lupita Nyong’o is so fabulous in Marie Claire for May 2014. Beautiful. Stunning.